Ruckus ICX 7250 VRF setup/config

This entry details the config for setting up and deploying VRFs on a Ruckus ICX 7250. Recently I had an issue where a client had a new ISP and that ISP gave them the Customer WAN /30 subnet, then routed their Customer LAN subnet (Public usable addresses) to their side of the /30.  The customer did not want any extra equipment installed like a router to handle the WAN routing, so the next best thing was to split the Ruckus 7250 switch into a WAN/LAN router – One switch to rule them all! The VRF feature is in Ruckus’s Layer 3 Premium feature set so a license will be needed. In this scenario the 7250 is the local gateway for all Vlans – so local LAN routing, and the Internet router.

Of course there are a lot of problems with the following design, like single point of failure, but its a small site, with 1 48 port switch, Fortigate firewall and cloud Voip SD-WAN router. The purpose of this design is to allow the Voip SD-WAN solution to be outside the firewall, so using the 7250 for both LAN/WAN routing really and it worked well. If the ISP would have not required a customer routing device we would have just setup a Internet-Vlan, set Fortigate/INSpeed to public IPs, and placed them in that vlan. But, the ISP is requiring a routing device in this instance.

Here is the design.

vrf-icx

Config:

I think the ICX series supported VRFs when it was running Brocade firmware, but I would recommend upgrading to Ruckus’s ICX firmware – Version number SPR08080 or greater. Of course the device has to be running the Routing firmware not the switching code. The VRF feature is in Ruckus’s Layer 3 Premium feature set so a license will be needed.

First lets enable the VRF, and increase the amount of routes.

system-max ip-route-default-vrf 9000
system-max ip-route-vrf 500
system-max ip6-route-vrf 500

These commands will  enable the VRF functionality and it will need you to reboot.

Next we can start configuring our VRF. In this case my /30 will be 1.1.1.0/29 – so .1 will be the ISP, .2 will be us. I will setup the routes for the VRF, and then the Vlan interface and apply the /30. There is a keyword in the VE config to make sure its associated to a given VRF. Within the VRF config you need to specifcy the Route Identifier – only matters locally.

vrf INTERNET-VRF
rd 11:11
ip router-id 12.5.110.2
address-family ipv4
ip route 0.0.0.0/0 12.5.110.1
exit-address-family
exit-vrf

vlan 300 name INTERNET-VRF by port  — My WAN Vlan for Fortigate WAN and SD-WAN router WAN interface. The Customer LAN Subnet goes here.
untagged ethe 1/1/19 ethe 2/1/23
router-interface ve 300
spanning-tree 802-1w
spanning-tree 802-1w priority 4094
!
vlan 400 name ISP-VRF by port — /30 ISP network
untagged ethe 1/1/24
router-interface ve 400
!

interface ve 400
vrf forwarding  ISP-VRF – This is the command to associate the VE to the VRF
ip address 12.5.110.2/30

interface ve 300
vrf forwarding INTERNET-VRF – This is the command to associate the VE to the VRF
ip address 1.1.1.2/29

Here is a subset of my user config – Vlan 40 – this is where most of the desktops go, and the gateway in this case 10.6.40.1/24 lives on the switch, on the default VRF.

vlan 40 name Computers by port
untagged ethe 1/1/1 to 1/1/18 ethe 1/1/21 ethe 2/1/1 to 2/1/18 ethe 2/1/22
router-interface ve 40
spanning-tree 802-1w
spanning-tree 802-1w priority 4094
!
!
show run int ve 40
interface ve 40
ip address 10.6.40.1 255.255.252.0
ip helper-address 1 10.6.10.10

Thats it! A show IP route of the default VRF (Switching VRF) shows:

#show ip route
Total number of IP routes: 9
Type Codes – B:BGP D:Connected O:OSPF R:RIP S:Static; Cost – Dist/Metric
BGP Codes – i:iBGP e:eBGP
OSPF Codes – i:Inter Area 1:External Type 1 2:External Type 2
Destination Gateway Port Cost Type Upti me
1 0.0.0.0/0 10.6.254.2 ve 254 1/1 S 1d17 h — This is the Fortigate
2 10.6.0.0/22 DIRECT ve 1 0/0 D 1d17 h
3 10.6.10.0/24 DIRECT ve 10 0/0 D 21h4 m
4 10.6.40.0/22 DIRECT ve 40 0/0 D 1d17 h
5 10.6.100.0/24 DIRECT ve 100 0/0 D 1d18 h
6 10.6.254.0/24 DIRECT ve 254 0/0 D 1d17 h
7 172.16.6.0/29 DIRECT ve 650 0/0 D 1m5s
8 192.168.6.0/24 DIRECT ve 1 0/0 D 1d17 h
9 192.168.100.0/24 172.16.6.1 ve 650 1/1 S 1m4s

But, if we specifcally show the Internet-VRF routes:

#show ip route vrf INTERNET-VRF
Total number of IP routes: 3
Type Codes – B:BGP D:Connected O:OSPF R:RIP S:Static; Cost – Dist/Metric
BGP Codes – i:iBGP e:eBGP
OSPF Codes – i:Inter Area 1:External Type 1 2:External Type 2
Destination Gateway Port Cost Type Uptime
1 0.0.0.0/0 12.116.193.1 ve 400 1/1 S 21h4m
2 12.5.110.0/30 DIRECT ve 300 0/0 D 20h57m
3 1.1.1.0/29 DIRECT ve 400 0/0 D 21h5m

And there we have it, the devices is now in two VRFs, a default and INTERNET-VRF with specific interfaces assigned to it. If you want to test pinging from that VRF specifically you can use the following commands:

#ping vrf INTERNET-VRF 8.8.8.8
Sending 1, 16-byte ICMP Echo to 8.8.8.8, timeout 5000 msec, TTL 64
Type Control-c to abort
Reply from 8.8.8.8 : bytes=16 time=1ms TTL=122
Success rate is 100 percent (1/1), round-trip min/avg/max=1/1/1 ms.

One response to “Ruckus ICX 7250 VRF setup/config

  1. hindishayarimm January 16, 2019 at 12:54 pm

    nice information on TravelingPacket – A blog of network musings thanks for sharing.
    plz check it. hindi shayari
    Love Shayari

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